TIPS & TECHNIQUES

How to Guide to the Aristo Train Engineer

    Long overdue to the large scale community is George Schreyer's book
called the "How to Guide to the Aristocraft Train Engineer".   It is
available at your local hobby shop, or can be purchased directly from
Aristo.
    As you are aware, the TE comes with "minimal" instructions, and we
all have been through the "trial and error" stage to make it work.  Most
of the knowledge we have about the TE is "folklore"  passed down from
train meet to train meet.
    This book takes you from understanding the operation of the basic
TE, to more advanced topics.  It starts with how and why the system
works along, with covering all system components.  An entire chapter is
devoted to using the TE with regular track power, command control with
constant track power, and onboard battery power.  There is a good
written set of instructions on setting up the transmitter, the receiver,
and antenna considerations.
    A chapter is devoted to Aristo PWC.  George clearly lists the
advantages and limitations of this power system.  He also devotes space
to the debate of track verses battery power.
    For those that use the CRE-55474 and CRE-55475 for turnouts or
remote accessory control,  an extensive chapter covers all aspects of
the units.  This includes programming options, accessory control, and
power source options.
     Advanced topics include onboard RX installations, TE Circuit
Descriptions, Using track side receivers for onboard control,  and
building fully interlocking turnout control.
     Though George is an engineer, he has written this book in easy to
understand layman's language, and has included numerous photos and
diagrams to illustrate each topic.  This is a "must" for any large scale
library.  It completely removes any mystery about the system and offers
many tips to allow for trouble free operation.  The retail price is
$24.95, but after you read it once, you will find that it is a technical
publication that you can not model without.
George writes a tips web site which is located at
www.girr.org/girr/tips/tips.html
He also has an e-mail address for those who have further questions on
any aspect of large scale railroading.